Tag Archives: interviews

The Dood Interviews Coooins.com

coooins website image

Screenshot coooins.com… great place to research altcoins & ICO’s

BitcoinDood: Hi and thanks for agreeing to this interview. You recently sent me an email about your coooins.com… project and after checking it out I was pretty impressed. Could you take a quick moment to introduce yourself and tell us a little about who you are and your relationship with coooins.com…?

Coooins: I am Chris and I am the creator of Coooins. I am from California, I spend most of my time traveling and working now. I am a serial entrepreneur who has worked on various websites for the past 5 years. My last major website was HeadTalker which was a viral marketing platform that scaled to 100k+ users before being aquired by Newswire. I launched Coooins on New Years Eve. Coooins is a cryptocurrency data aggregation platform and portfolio tracker. You can research cryptocurrencies, ICO’s, subreddits, exchanges, Product Hunts, tweets, YouTube videos, and more!

BitcoinDood: I was most impressed with the amount of information available for traders looking to research projects. Tell the readers a little about coooins.com…, and the type of information they can find there.

Coooins: Thats great to hear. Coooins is a platform that is aggregating cryptocurrency related data from many resources. The site is currently connecting to 9 different API’s and will be connecting to more in the future. You can currently research 1,500 coins, 2,000+ ICO’s, 80+ Exchanges, 60 popular subreddits, cryptocurrency producthunts, 100 influencers, related tweets, related videos, and much more.

BitcoinDood: The site is pretty new. When did the project go live and how has it been recieved by the crypto community so far?

Coooins: The site is 10 weeks old. I started doing marketing 6 weeks ago. Only a small percentage of the community has seen Coooins. The feedback has been positive most of the time. I have also got some constructive feedback on the site which helps improve the platform. There is so many amazing cryptocurrency websites, I will have to keep working hard if I want Coooins to stick out from the crowd.

BitcoinDood: It’s great having so much information in one place. Why should users of your website trust coooins.com… as a source of good and reliable information? How is your data collected, and what insures its accuracy?

Coooins: Coooins is very new and has to establish trust within the community. Coooins gets most of its data from well establed platforms through their API’s. Its an intelligent decision for traders and investors to check multiple resources when researching.

BitcoinDood: The site has so many great features already. Are there plans to add any new features in the future?

Coooins: Yes the site is just getting started. It started as a side project and I have started to dedicate more time to it. A lot of the current features and data can be heavily improved so I want to spend some focus on that before adding more unique features.

BitcoinDood: The Dood really appreciates you taking the time to do this interview. I know you’re probably really busy and I just wanted to put together a few questions to introduce my readers to your terrific website. Is there anything you would like to add or tell the readers about that hasn’t been covered already?

Coooins: I appreciate the interview. To the readers: Check out coooins.com… and feel free to drop me some feedback to improve the website.

BitcoinDood: I generally end every interview with the same last question. What are your thoughts about the future of cryptocurrency in general? Where do you see this all heading? If we had a crystal ball and looked specifically to see what happens to cryptocurrency, what do you think we would see?

Coooins: My Prediction: There will be a flippening from fiat to cryptocurrency within the next decade after a few major fiat currencies collapse. People will lose trust in the old system and run to cryptocurrency as a safe haven. Certain countries will adapt it before others and thrive. Technology companies will start launching ICO’s instead of going down the traditional IPO route. More and more vendors will start accepting cryptocurrency. Blockchain will play a big role in purchasing real estate. Stock markets will slowly fade away as new companies go down the token route. The web will change rapidly. We are heading from web 2.0 to web 3.0 where cryptocurrencies, decentralization, distribution, oracles, blockchain, and new technologies will be used.

 

Website: coooins.com…
Twitter: twitter.com…

Interview With shwifteey From FUCK token.


BitcoinDood: First off, thanks for taking the time to answer the questions for this 
interview. Could you take a moment and introduce yourself, tell us a little 
about the project you represent and your relationship to the project?


shwifteey: My pleasure dood! I go by shwifteey and I am the community manager and business developer for FUCK Token. My partner Jexprand, the creator of FUCK Token, takes care of the more technical aspects of smart contracts and other types of coding.



BitcoinDood: So I guess my first question is.. Why fuck token? What made you name your 
token FUCK? I honestly can’t wait to see this hit exchanges just so I can
 see FUCK listed.


shwifteey: Jexprand originally incepted FUCK Token in early June of this year after binge watching SouthPark. I think all of the swearing kind of gave him an epiphany. He posted his creation on Bitcointalk and I immediately saw the potential for this project. He was hesitant to turn FUCK Token into something real but I kept pushing him to the point of being annoying. Our main goal with FUCK is to give a real, tangible value to the word in the form of currency. It’s a surprisingly deep question: “How can you give a fuck, if there are no fucks to give?” We took that concept, applied our love for cryptocurrencies/Ethereum and gave birth to FUCK Token.


BitcoinDood:Before PIMPcash re-branded to OKcash I remember they got a lot of flack 
from some of the different exchanges. Many took offense to the ticker PIMP.
 How has the name been received by the cryptocurrency community, and have
 you taken any flack for the ticker from different exchanges?

shwifteey: People either love FUCK Token or hate it. Exchanges have been very hesitant to list us (big surprise, I know). We have a lot of exchanges that want to be as professional as possible and don’t want the word FUCK all over their site. As our community grows, the exchanges are starting to realize that we are not a joke and some are easing up to the idea. As our tip bot rolls out I’m expecting exchanges to no longer give a fuck about our name and take notice that we are serious about creating something fun and valuable.


BitcoinDood:From what I understand this all started as an ICO. Why did you choose the
ICO model for your coin?

shwifteey: The main goal of our ICO was to raise funds to pay for exchange and marketing fees. Jexprand and I hit a point where we couldn’t afford some of the costs of taking FUCK Token to the next level. Now we have enough padding to pay for exchanges, market properly and hire developers. We set a hard cap because most ICOs ask for WAY too much money and end up ruining trust with their investors. We needed to show everyone that FUCK isn’t a money grab and we don’t need millions to bring it to the mainstream.


BitcoinDood: 

Recently the industry has been bombarded by ICO offer after ICO offer. What 
are your thoughts on the ICO business model? Do you think it’s here to stay
 or do you think this is just an industry trend that will eventually cool
 off and fade away?


shwifteey: I think it is here to stay. It’s amazing that almost anyone can invest in a project or company without being heavily involved with investment firms. Your average person can now throw some money towards a company or idea that they believe in.

The ICO model is not perfect though. What bothers me is the current craze surrounding them. Companies don’t need hundreds of millions of dollars to build software that takes three months to build. Cryptocurrencies are highly speculative and a lot of people are going to get burned when companies don’t deliver on their promises. Once these sorts of letdowns are common, I expect the ICO craze to cool off. Investors will spend more time researching the fundamentals of the companies as the market gets over-saturated.


BitcoinDood:Many people are probably asking themselves if this is a parody token or
 you’re actually serious about this project. Where do you stand with this?
Are you serious, just having fun or somewhere in the middle?


shwifteey: We are somewhere in the middle, leaning towards serious. Although, being serious about delivering our promises doesn’t mean you can’t have fun while doing it. We want people to enjoy the process of learning about cryptocurrencies. Sending someone a FUCK is still quite complicated to a newcomer: you need to understand Ethereum wallets, gas, tokens etc. Although the Doge creator hates me for using this, I picture FUCK Token as the Doge of Ethereum. We are going to deliver our product with a nice amount of fuckery and fun in the process. We know there is huge potential for introducing newcomers to cryptocurrency through tipping FUCKs. The name immediately grabs your attention, for better or worse.

BitcoinDood: ERC20 tokens are all the rage right now. What are your thoughts on ERC20
tokens? If someone told you they were considering using the ERC20 platform 
for their next project, what would you tell them?


shwifteey: I am definitely biased on this question because I am a big fan of Ethereum. Part of the appeal for FUCK Token is that it is an ERC20 token and anyone can store it on their Ethereum wallet. For an altcoin trader or holder, having 50 different wallets can become a pain in the ass. I’d tell anyone starting an ERC20 token that they should thoroughly test their contract multiple times and have as many people check it as possible. Even companies raising millions of dollars have problems with their smart contracts.


BitcoinDood:It seems someone actually gave a fuck about The Dood… Actually a couple
fucks were found in The Dood’s Ethereum wallet. Besides people actually
 wanting to give a fuck, is there a special purpose or use case you’re
 trying to achieve with FUCK?


shwifteey: We’re leaving the door open for FUCK token use cases. Some community members have taken it upon themselves to send hackers 1 FUCK to show how they felt. These types of shenanigans are FUCK Token approved and encouraged. We’ll be pushing r/gonewild adoption of FUCK as their main tipping currency. I’m sure the ladies there will appreciate a tip of real money rather than an upvote. We’re also discussing the possibility of setting up a “Give a FUCK” charity, where anyone can donate money to a cause of their choice. The word “FUCK” has so much untapped potential and we are willing to explore any possible avenue that comes our way.



BitcoinDood: So you guys are actually working on tipbots and integrating use of the 
token into various social medial platforms. Could you give us some reasons
 why anybody would “give a FUCK” on social media, and what else can we
 expect for your roadmap moving forward?


shwifteey: Right now our main focus is ironing out the details of our Reddit tip bot. We’ve noticed there is a large demand to give someone “No FUCKs”, so we’ve integrated burning of FUCKs into our bot. The concept is that you care so little about someone’s comment you are willing to light a couple FUCKs on fire, never to be seen again. This also acts as incentive for investors because the total supply of FUCKs on earth decreases. We are also creating a “Hall of FUCKs”, where the world’s biggest FUCKers and biggest burners will be showcased. I’m sure it would be nice to know you give the most (or least) FUCKs out of anyone in the world.

After our Reddit tip bot we’ll be focusing on Twitter. We have plans to create a Chrome plugin that simplifies the process of giving and receiving a FUCK on Twitter. Later down the line we’ll move towards Slack, Discord and Twitch.

Eventually we’d like to have a central hub where all of our tipping platforms are connected, kind of like a FUCK hub. That way you can link your accounts between bots and easily withdraw/add FUCKs to all social media platforms. We’re discussing integration with WordPress, so anyone can give a FUCK about your blog posts with a small widget on the bottom. We haven’t added these to our roadmap but we’ve got to keep people on their toes ya know?



BitcoinDood: You guys are currently in the process of getting listed on exchanges. Where 
can people get some FUCK’s if they want them?


shwifteey: Currently FUCKs are available on Etherdelta and NovaExchange.

Etherdelta: etherdelta.github.io/#FUCK-ETH…

Novaexchange: novaexchange.com…



BitcoinDood: Thanks again for taking the time for this interview. Do you have anything
 you would like to add about the project that hasn’t already been covered in
 the interview?


shwifteey: I want to give a shout out to our tip bot developer, Dave-zilla. This guys is truly a coding wizard and has done more for FUCK Token than anyone else. Big ups Dave. Also, I want to thank you, Dood, for taking the time to interview us. We appreciate the Dood and all his work!

BitcoinDood: 
Thanks, I appreciate the kind words I end every interview with the same last question. Where do you see 
cryptocurrency headed in the future? Any thoughts, trends or predictions 
you can share on the future of cryptocurrency in general?


shwifteey: Without sounding like too much of moon-kid, I see crypto revolutionizing our society in ways we can’t even imagine yet. I think the general public will never care to understand it on a technical level but will use it every day- kind of like the internet. In 1977, you’d be called a fool for trying to explain what society is like today. For crypto, I don’t think anyone can predict which coin(s) will come out on top- all I know is we are in for one hell of a ride over the next 10 years.

Thanks again to shwifteey for the great interview. If you’d like to find out more about FUCK token you can check out these links here:

www.fucktoken.io

www.reddit.com…

www.twitter.com…

bitcointalk.org…

Thanks for reading this interview all the way to the end. Feel free to comment with your Ethereum address and maybe someone will give a FUCK.

Giveaway complete! I’m using myetherwallet and I keep getting weird errors! I’ll audit what was sent out and make sure everyone got coins! Thanks

The Dood Interviews, Brian Innes Attorney.

legal, blind justice

BitcoinDood: First off, thanks a lot for taking time out of your busy schedule to answer these questions. I’m really excited about this interview. I’m just a trader, and have an extremely basic understanding of the legalities of cryptocurrency so it’s really exciting to talk to someone from this sector of the industry. Please excuse my basic terminology when asking legal questions. This topic can get pretty confusing for the average guy, and The Dood’s about as average as they come 🙂

BitcoinDood: To start with, could you please take a moment and introduce yourself, tell us a little about who you are and what you do?

Brian Innes: My name is Brian Innes. I am attorney practicing in Utah. My practice focuses on business and real estate transactions. I am also working to develop an expertise in the legal issues surrounding blockchains and cryptocurrencies.

Before starting, I need to make the following disclaimer. This interview does not constitute legal advice and should not be relied on by any person. This interview is designed for general informational purposes. You should seek advice from your own counsel, who is familiar with the particular facts and circumstances of what you intend to do and can give you tailored advice. No attorney client-relationship is created, nor is this intended to be attorney advertising in any jurisdiction.

BitcoinDood: From a lawyer’s perspective, what are your thoughts on Bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general?

Brian Innes: From a legal perspective, it feels like we are in uncharted territory when it comes to cryptocurrencies and blockchain legal issues. Current laws and regulatory frameworks are not adequate to address all of the challenges and issues raised by cryptocurrency and blockchain technology. These laws and frameworks will need to evolve to deal with these new challenges. Also, as a contract attorney, the potential for disruption of the legal industry by smart contracts is something I am watching with interest.

BitcoinDood: How did you first get involved with cryptocurrency?

Brian Innes: I first heard about Bitcoin a number of years ago. At the time, I didn’t really see the usefulness of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. It wasn’t until I learned about blockchains that the light turned on. Once I understood the potential use cases and applications for blockchains, I became really interested in cryptocurrencies.

BitcoinDood: From a legal standpoint, what is bitcoin and cryptocurrency? Is it money, a commodity, a security, some sort of financial instrument? What legal category would cryptocurrency fall under?

Brian Innes: One of the first things I learned in law school was the answer to the nearly every question asked by a law professor is “it depends.” I think that’s applicable here. Depending on the context, a cryptocurrency or blockchain token could be any of the above. Some people are purchasing blockchain tokens to use as money, some are purchasing blockchain tokens like gold or another commodity, some are purchasing blockchain tokens as a store of value and others are purchasing blockchain tokens as investments in the same way they would a security. Depending on the applications and uses of a particular token it could be any or all of the above.

BitcoinDood: A really touchy subject in the cryptocurrency space is regulation. For an industry that was basically started by a group of self-proclaimed crypto-anarchists, “regulation” is a dirty word. I see the eventual regulation of cryptocurrency as inevitable. Overall, where do you see regulation heading in the future? What type of laws do you think we can expect in the future and why?

Brian Innes: Regulation of blockchain tokens is difficult, among other reasons, because of their hybrid nature. Tokens and currencies with different properties will likely need to be treated differently. There can’t be a one size fits all regulation scheme for all cryptocurrencies, any regulations will need to be flexible enough to account for the difference between currencies and their uses.

I think the regulation we will see first will be in the securities law arena. The frothy ICO marketplace has already attracted and will continue to attract people looking to make a quick buck by using blockchain tokens to perpetrate pyramid or other fraudulent schemes. Many ICOs are also looking very much like securities offering. Even the term ICO is confusingly similar to the term IPO, which is a securities offering. It’s not even just fraudsters that are running afoul of the law. There are legitimate ICOs out there that likely have violated securities laws. Any securities offering must be either registered with the SEC or exempt from registration. Any ICO that is deemed to be a securities offering must be registered with the SEC. Failing to get this approval or having a valid exemption to rely upon can result in serious consequences. The registration process is designed to protect investors by requiring the promoter of an offering to provide sufficient disclosures for an investor to make an informed decision. I expect the SEC to step in at some point and reign in ICOs.

BitcoinDood: We’ve seen many states begin to pass “cryptocurrency laws”. New York has the BitLicense, and I know a few other states have passed laws, or are in the process of drafting laws. Many cryptocurrency businesses will not deal with individual states for legal reasons. How can a small business or start up protect themselves from state by state compliance issues?

Brian Innes: I think the first step is for the business owner to do as much research as possible on their own to learn what potential laws and regulations apply to their business. The less jurisdictions the business owner is conducting business in, the easier it will be to keep up with compliance issues. The next step would be to hire an attorney with expertise in the area.

BitcoinDood:  It will probably just be a matter of time before federal regulators get involved and draft additional legislation. My understanding is federal law, supersedes state law. What types of laws do you think the government will try to enforce with cryptocurrency, and would federal regulation straighten out a lot of the issues with state by state compliance?

Brian Innes: I agree with you. I think it’s a matter of when not if regulation comes. The SEC seems to be the organization most likely to take the lead with respect to cryptocurrency regulation. Federal securities laws do preempt state securities laws, but there are also in some circumstances additional rules and regulations imposed by state regulators that must be followed.

BitcoinDood:  So we’ve covered state law and federal law, but cryptocurrency is a global phenomena without borders. Cryptocurrency is decentralized, without a single point of failure. For instance bitcoin miners all over the world keep the bitcoin network up and running. There technically is no way to stop bitcoin unless you shut off every mining rig around the globe. For example, if you cut off the Chinese miners, then the Venezuelan miners, Brazilian miners, and all the other global miners are now keeping the network running. Based on that fact, many argue that any regulation is unenforceable. What do you say to those people who think regulation is unenforceable? Are they correct or delusional?

Brian Innes:  Coordinated international regulation would be difficult if not impossible to accomplish, but countries could definitely regulate (to some extent) the purchase and use of blockchain tokens in their own countries. In the United States, for example, the SEC could bring blockchain tokens under their purview and prohibit ICO organizers from selling blockchain tokens to any unaccredited investors in the United States without appropriate disclosures. Some blockchain token ICOs already restrict purchases from US citizens because they don’t want to deal with US securities laws. The decentralized and autonomous nature of cryptocurrencies makes it difficult for regulators and lawmakers to catch up and decide what do. Existing law is likely inadequate to deal with cryptocurrencies and will need to change and evolve to meet this new challenge. Because of the international nature of cryptocurrencies, governments will have a really tough time trying to shut cryptocurrencies down entirely. Also governments that try and overregulate cryptocurrencies run the risk of falling behind the times and other countries that are friendlier toward cryptocurrencies. Another area of potential regulation is with banking. If the US government wanted to discourage cryptocurrencies, they could make it difficult for banks to handle cash from cryptocurrency trading.

BitcoinDood: If an investor gets caught up in a blatant ICO scam, do they have any legal recourse? What can they do?

Brian Innes: I think it would be exceedingly difficult to have any meaningful recourse. Finding the promoter, suing the promoter, obtaining a judgment against the promoter, and collecting on the judgment, would be difficult but not impossible. Because of these risks, investors need make sure they’ve really done their homework before purchasing tokens in an ICO.

BitcoinDood:  Anyone that’s been involved in altcoin trading for any length of time can see there’s all kinds of insider trading and market manipulation going on in this industry. I’ve seen several pump groups on twitter and different social groups. Most of these groups select a coin, pump up the price by buying large amounts of the coin while hyping it up on social networks, then when it reaches a certain price they dump the coin back into the market driving down the price. Are these groups legal? Wouldn’t this be considered inside trading? Should participants in these groups be worried?

Brian Innes: This type of conduct is definitely illegal under existing securities laws. Pump and dump schemes are common with thinly traded stocks and are heavily scrutinized by the SEC. Doing the same thing with cryptocurrencies doesn’t seem to be any different to me. People engaging in this conduct could be subject to both criminal and civil actions. I would be surprised if the SEC isn’t already aware of and investigating these types of schemes.

BitcoinDood: Cryptocurrency and taxes. As far as I know there really isn’t a tax code that deals with cryptocurrency. Most people in the industry want to pay their taxes, but don’t even know where to begin. I asked my accountant about it last year and she was at a complete loss. Do you have any suggestions on how cryptocurrency traders should be handling the taxes on their gains and losses?

Brian Innes: The IRS has provided some guidance on taxation of cryptocurrency: www.irs.gov… and www.irs.gov…. For tax purposes, my understanding is the IRS treats cryptocurrency like property and not foreign currency. That means someone selling goods or services that are paid for in cryptocurrency must pay taxes on the value of the currency on the day received. Gain on cryptocurrency is also taxed. The tax treatment depends on whether the cryptocurrency is held as a capital asset or not. Cryptocurrency held as a capital asset is given capital gains treatment. Cryptocurrency that is not held as a capital asset is given ordinary income treatment. With respect to mining, the miner is required to recognize the revenue at fair market value on the date the coin in mined and appreciation would also be subject to additional tax.

BitcoinDood: The Dood really appreciates your time, thanks so much for answering these questions. I ask all my interviews the same last question. Where do you see cryptocurrency in general, heading in the future?

Brian Innes: I am really bullish on the future of cryptocurrency. I do expect some measure of price correction in the future, but long term, I think the outlook is positive. The potential of blockchain is limitless and I think people find some amazing ways to use it.

BitcoinDood:  If people want to retain your services, how can they get in contact with you?

Brian Innes: Anyone interested can follow me on Twitter at @blockchain_law.

Thanks again to Brian Innes for taking the time to answer The Dood’s questions. Please remember nothing here, in this post, or on this website is meant as legal or financial advice. Please seek a duly licensed professional for such matters. Thanks for reading, and happy trading everyone!

Interview With Lewis Just of The Eco coin Project

ECO coin logo

ECO coin To economically reward environmental action

BitcoinDood: Thanks so much for taking the time to respond to this interview. Could you please tell the readers a little about who you are and your relationship to the ECO coin project?

Lewis Just: My name is Lewis Just and I am the project leader of the ECO coin, which is an initiative of Next Nature. We are a think and design organization based in Amsterdam that stems from a need to explore how technology and nature come together to create our future environment, our Next Nature.

BD:  ECO coin will be a bit different than other cryptocurrencies out there. From what I understand, its main purpose is to help as an incentive based token, to reward individuals for acts of eco freindly actions. The PDF you sent me uses the phrase, “To economically reward environmental action”. Can you expound on this a little more and tell us how a cryptocurrency can be utilized for this purpose?

LJ: Absolutely. When we look at our current economic system is seems that we often reward actions that our terrible for our ecology in order to gain profits, grow business and help a debt-based economy survive. And yet we do very little to truly understand or protect the value of our shared ecology. It seems strange that businesses can make money from cutting down the forest and turning it into a raw material, but citizens are not paid to plant the forest.

Although there are some initiatives (ecosystem services, carbon trading etc.) that try and combat this growing issue they are often top down solutions that rely on bureaucracy and are there to limit the damages done. The ECO coin by contrast is a currency that positively rewards citizens who are actively contributing to a more sustainable world. It is a bottom up approach that we are designing to help catalyze our economy and society to transition to a more ecological one.

We believe that by utilizing blockchain technologies we can make the ECO coin a project that is not owned by one but many. Having the ECO coin as a cryptocurrency also means that the way in which it is created does not need to be the same as the way in which fiat money is created, through the creation of debt. Carrying out sustainably good actions can create it.

BD: You’re planning on partnering with some pretty big names with the likes of Deloitte and Bitonic. Can you talk a little about these organizations and how they will help the advancement of ECO coin?

LJ: Yes, the ECO coin has been an idea of Next Nature for some time now but it is only fairly recently that we have really been transforming the project from a theoretical idea into a practical solution. To do this we feel it’s best to collaborate and find partnerships that fit and we have been fortunate to find these with Deloitte and Bitonic. Both organizations have fantastic people with really hands on knowledge of blockchain technologies and implementation expertise. They will help us to run community experiments to see the strengths and weaknesses of the currency so that we can develop it into the strongest possible form it can be. At Next Nature we really believe that no single party should own the system but that we should all help to bring it to life.

BD: Your white paper states that the coin will be promoted and used at music festivals. This seems like an absolutely brilliant idea and great way to introduce a lot of new people to the use of cryptocurrency. I’ve helped promote rave parties back in the mid 90’s and giving 10,000 plus people instructions on anything can be a bit daunting. What is your vision for this idea and how would it be executed?

LJ: The great thing about music festivals is that they come with amazing communities and the space provides a great context as it has everything you might find in a city (water and energy infrastructure, food and marketplaces, housing etc). The key to making the ECO coin a success at a music festival is to design the system so that festival goers can learn as they go. So the ECO coin will be integrated into RFID wristband tickets meaning everyone already has their ECO coin wallets. Then people can earn and spend throughout the festival when they like. Say you use a digital ticket instead of a paper ticket to enter the festival ground, then you can immediately earn an ECO coin. Attend a lecture or workshop about sustainability and you can earn more ECO coins. Help to keep the festival tidy of plastic cups, earn even more. You can then spend your ECO coins onsite on meat-free food, exclusive digital downloads or if you earn enough ECO coins you can become a V.E.P. Much like a V.I.P but you will reach Very Ecological Person status and gain access to areas of the festival that others can’t. It’s definitely going to be a challenge to execute but we have a great festival onboard (we will be announcing who in the next few weeks so keep following our progress at nextnature.net…) so we are optimistic we can make it a success.

BD: One of your plans will be to have approved businesses, festivals, and projects, to earn and use ECO coin. The white paper I read discourages trading to fiat or to other currencies. I’m trying to wrap my head around how this will work. If businesses are accepting ECO coin for goods and services won’t they eventually want to cash out for some other form of fiat or cryptocurrency? I’m imagining some guy renting bicycles at the beach and accepting ECO coin. Once he accrues a good amount of ECO’s he’s going to want to cash those out. How will business owners go about this and will this coin be listed on any of the altcoin exchanges?

LJ: Yes, although we cannot stop people from buying and selling the ECO coin we would always promote that you earn them through environmentally good actions. We want to avoid businesses “cashing out” by making sure that internal trading can happen from the other ECO coin businesses. So if the bicycle repairman has many ECO coins he can spend them on employing an urban miner to go and salvage old bike parts. The miner can then spend the ECO coins on locally grown fruit and vegetables and so forth. This idea is borrowed from the Wir Bank, which has a very successful track record of strengthening business ties whilst lowering the amount of cash liquidity a business needs. This is just one idea but we are also looking at other currencies and ways in which you might be able to invest your ECO coins in new green businesses. We also hope that becoming an ECO coin business will carry some reputational value with it. So like B Corporations, the ECO coin stamp will be a marker of a sustainable business or organization.

BD: From what I’m gathering you currently have a proof of concept and the ECO coin itself is not available yet. When can we expect to see an actual working blockchain and completed project? Please feel free to talk about any road map plans as well.

LJ: That’s correct. We are not yet on a blockchain but are, with our partners, exploring the best way to achieve this. There are many ways we can realize the ECO coin on a blockchain but we also want to use the technology when it’s appropriate. Many projects use blockchain technology too early without establishing a great community to use their coin. So our road map for the ECO coin is first focused on testing the currency within a local community (a music festival). Once we understand how to make it efficient and easy to use then we will look to spread the currency to other communities to create an international network of ECO coin users. This will go hand in hand with implementing the coin on a blockchain so that it will become a global cryptocurrency for anyone, anywhere to use.

BD: On the last page of your white paper it talks about the benefits of using the blockchain for the ECO coin token. The paper explains the benefits of blockchain voting, and making it more decentralized and democratic. Are you planning something like what the DASH community is currently doing with voting for projects and the distribution of budget funds? dashvotetracker.com… How will the democratization and decentralization of the blockchain benefit ECO coin and the ECO community in general?

LJ: Exactly that. We see that blockchain technology can facilitate a far more decentralized governance system. Although the project will start with a core team/leadership we want to democratize the system so that everyone using the ECO coins can have a say in its future. We believe that no single party should own the system, but that all partners and users should be able to improve the system. In that sense making the project open source is really important to us.

BD: I remember reading about a very similar project awhile back, and at first I thought this was that project. I’ve always thought this was a novel use of blockchain technology and I love the concept of an incentive based cryptocurrency that helps to better the environment. While researching for this interview, I came across multiple other coins with the same name and ticker symbol, ‘ECO’. It looks like most of these other projects have been abandoned. How will you separate yourselves from the other ECO’s out there?

LJ: For us it’s less about separating ourselves from other projects (actually we are open to collaborate when it makes sense if we are working towards the same goals) and more about making sure that our ECO coin is something that, to stick with the environmental analogies, can grow organically. This means it has to start with making sure there is a community for this currency and that all parties are benefiting from its use. I don’t see a problem with many initiatives exploring this idea of valuing our ecology in tandem, especially when others also share what they learn from their experiments.

BD:  I really appreciate your time in responding to this interview. Is there anything that you would like to add or talk about that hasn’t been covered already?

LJ: If you want to follow our progress on the ECO coin and support our project we welcome you to become a member of the Next Nature Network at nextnature.net…

BD: I ask all my interviews the same last question. Cryptocurrency will likely play a large roll in future society. How do you see cryptocurrency in general being used in the future?

LJ: Personally, I see any technology as a way to achieve some sort of societal goal. So I believe cryptocurrencies certainly have the potential to play a strong role in the future of our society because it can allow us to develop and redesign our monetary system. I think one major success of the Bitcoin and altcoin movement is that it has helped open up the conversation about how and what we value in our society. Euros, Pounds, Yen and Dollars represent one form of value but I believe its far more interesting to have many currencies representing many value systems in the world. This creates not only a more resilient economy, but also a far more diverse economy that people, objects and even plants may one day be a part of.

The Dood would like to thank Lewis Just of The ECO coin Project for taking the time to answer these questions. I’m really looking forward to watching this coin develop and wish the entire ECO coin team the best of luck on this project and all their future endeavors. This is an interesting use of blockchain technology and I’m really looking forward to following this project in the future. Try these links to learn more about ECO coin and to follow their development.

www.nextnature.net…

Coming soon: ecocoin.com…

On twitter: twitter.com…

 

Interview With Sam Patterson From OpenBazaar

OpenBazaar Marketplace logo

OpenBazaar is an open source decentralized marketplace.

BitcoinDood – Thanks for taking the time to do this interview. I was really excited about getting the opportunity to talk to someone from your organization. This has been a project that I’ve followed for some time now. Could you please take a moment to tell us who you are and your relationship to the OpenBazaar project?

Sam Patterson – I’m Sam Patterson, a co-founder of OB1, the company that develops OpenBazaar.

BitcoinDood – OpenBazaar is a decentralized peer to peer marketplace. Could you explain a little about what that means and how it works?

Sam Patterson – Most online commerce today is done by using centralized marketplaces, owned by huge companies. Those marketplaces take a cut of every transaction, they collect the data of buyers and sellers, and they place restrictions on what can be bought or sold. OpenBazaar is different; it’s a marketplace that isn’t controlled by a company or any central organization. It’s a decentralized marketplace, meaning it’s a collection of people running the software and connecting directly to each other in order to buy and sell. Engaging in trade directly means there are no middleman to charge fees, collect data, or censor transactions.

BitcoinDood – I have to admit, when I first signed on I was almost a little nervous and not really sure what to expect. Thoughts of the darknet filled my head, and I was hoping The Dood wouldn’t end up on yet another Government watch list for just being curious… LOL half kidding… Yet I was really surprised to find a fairly tame marketplace, with very little controversial content if any. OpenBazaar is a marketplace not much different from say Ebay or even Overstock for that matter. I found everything from clothing, bumper stickers, to food products and honey. I don’t know why I expected it to be a little more say “Underground” is this a common misconception of OpenBazaar?

Sam Patterson – OpenBazaar started as a fork of the “Dark Market” hackathon entry in 2014, and many still have a misconception that OpenBazaar is an underground or darknet marketplace. OpenBazaar has always been about making trade free for everyone, not focusing on any type of trade or community. We believe that the benefits of a free and permissionless trade platform are significant and should be available to everyone.

BitcoinDood – So this is another really cool opensource software project.Can you tell us a little about the development, the number of people involved, and how the decision making process works?

Sam Patterson – Since OpenBazaar began in April 2014 it’s been open source and community driven. The number of contributors has fluctuated, but there are several dozen people around the world who have submitted code and hundreds who have tested, opened issues, and submitted bug reports. The majority of the work has been done by the developers working for OB1, the company founded in order to hire dedicated developers to build the platform. Our project leader, Brian Hoffman, has been leading the development since he started the project initially.

BitcoinDood – OpenBazaar bills itself as a decentralized network for peer to peer commerce online.There are no fees and there are no restrictions. Without fees, how does the project fund itself?

Sam Patterson – Originally the project solely consisted of volunteers. Eventually Brian Hoffman, Washington Sanchez and I decided that we wanted to form a company to hire dedicated developers and build OpenBazaar properly. We formed OB1 and obtained venture capital investment. As of the end of 2016 we’ve raised $4 million in venture capital. OB1 will offer value-added services to OpenBazaar users in the future in order to make money, but will never change the software to force users to pay fees.

BitcoinDood – So to go back to my earlier statement about not knowing what to expect the first time I logged on. OpenBazaar encourages an open market without any restrictions yet when I logged onto the client I was surprised to see how tame the listings actually were. Are there any restrictions on what users can post? How does the marketplace maintain such a “wholesome” environment without any restrictions? I was really surprised at how professional, and mainstream the offers I found on your platform were.

Sam Patterson – There are no restrictions on what a user can post. We encourage users to list their items as NSFW if applicable, and in the software there are tools to block other users if they offer items that you don’t like or they are harassing you. Most people just want a platform where they can buy and sell without fees and other restrictions while using Bitcoin, and OpenBazaar is the only place to do that right now.

BitcoinDood – Currently you can only make purchases with bitcoin? Are there any plans to add other cryptocurrencies down the road?

Sam Patterson – In the latest release we added ShapeShift integration, which allows users to spend a variety of cryptocurrencies. Bitcoin is the core currency because it’s the most widely used cryptocurrency and has all the necessary features (such as multisignature transaction).

BitcoinDood – I’ve loved everything about OpenBazaar so far. I have to say though the software wasn’t the easiest to get working. I run an OpenSuse laptop and had to do a bit of tweaking to get it running on my machine, but hey that’s linux, and that’s almost the norm for linux users. I did however try to install the software on a Windows10 PC at work and to my surprise also ran into some difficulties with the install. When I did a google search I discovered I wasn’t the only one. Is there an effort underway to make the install process a little easier? Granted once the client is installed and running it certainly is worth the effort.

Sam Patterson – Getting peer-to-peer software to install and connect correctly across all operating systems and network configurations has proven difficult. We’ve tried to make the process simpler and more reliable, but we’re aware it doesn’t work properly for all users. Fortunately, the 2.0 version of the software (to be released this year) makes substantial improvements in installation and reliability. Our community is very helpful and if you have a problem, feel free to join our Slack group and ask for help.

BitcoinDood – From what I gather, vendors are kept honest through the use of moderators. Could you explain a little how the moderation system works? Can anyone become a moderator and are the moderators rewarded in some way?

Sam Patterson – Moderators are a third party that both buyer and seller agree to in order to use an escrow system. Using 2-of-3 multisig all three parties have a key to the funds, but two of those parties must agree in order for the funds to be released. Normally the buyer and seller agree and they release the funds when the transaction is completed, but if there is a dispute then the moderator is notified. They talk to the parties and determine how to resolve the dispute, then join with the winning party to release funds to them. Anyone can become a moderator; it’s an open marketplace. Moderators are rewarded by receiving a percentage of the overall transaction when they resolve a dispute.

BitcoinDood – Thank you so much for your time in answering these questions. Is there anything you want to add, or any special news you would like to share that hasn’t already been covered?

Sam Patterson – OpenBazaar costs nothing to try out so we encourage anyone interested in Bitcoin or decentralized technologies to test it out and let us know what they think. The 2.0 version of the software is being built on IPFS, which will allow stores to be visible even when they are offline, and includes many other major improvements. To follow along with the development of the software, check out our blog.

Bloggers note: IPFS stands for InterPlanetary File System A peer-to-peer hypermedia protocol. TechCrunch wrote an interesting article about it here.

BitcoinDood – I ask all my interviews the same last question. Could you share any thoughts or predictions of where you see bitcoin and cryptocurrency going in the future? If I handed you a working crystal ball, what do you think we would see?

Sam Patterson – Permissionless money and permissionless trade are concepts too powerful to not gain traction over the coming years. In countries with devaluation or demonetization of currency, Bitcoin will become an increasingly popular alternative, leading to the adoption of platforms such as OpenBazaar to facilitate use of the currency. Even in countries with stable currencies we’ll see more use of Bitcoin and OpenBazaar because of the increasing growth of the digital economy and diminishing importance of where digital workers physically reside.

Thanks to Sam Patterson for taking the time to talk about this truly interesting project. You can find out more about OpenBazaar and download the software on their website:

openbazaar.org…

OpenBazaar GitHub

OpenBazaar on Reddit.

OpenBazaar on Twitter

Special thanks to the OpenBazaar Twitter folks for helping to put this interview together. Much appreciated! Thanks also to Sam Patterson for sharing the OpenBazaar story with me and my readers. Your time is greatly appreciated.